Lincoln Center

institute

 

 

for the arts in education

Collaborators: Art Specialist: David McGreevy and Teaching Artist: John Toth

At

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
July8-12, 2002
pARTnering

Line of Inquiry

How is the partnering of Teaching Artist (aesthetics) with Art Specialists (curriculum) affected by the relationship of skills, context and aesthetics?

Questions

How do artist in aesthetics partner with art specialists?

What are the differences between aesthetic ed and art ed?

What is the subtext for art specialist?

What is mandated in art curriculum? How to you transcend mandates?

How do we use aesthetics to affect curriculum mandates?

What is the role between skill and context?

What is the role of reflection with artists?

Focus for Session

Making choices that explore the relationship of skills, context and aesthetics within the partnership of the Art Specialist and the Visual Arts teaching Artist.

The Collection

Grant Wood, “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere

Florine Stettheimer, “The Cathedrals of Art

Chinese Rock Garden

Chuck Close, “Portrait”

African: Dogon, Ancestral Figures

Bill Viola, Video Installation

Barnett Neuman, “Composition”

Clifford Still, “Untitled”

Salvador Dali, “Madonna”

 

Emmanuelle Leutz, “George Washington Crossing the Delaware

 

 

Ask questions and make lists

 

In what ways can multiple senses be engage with this artwork?

Consider the composition and design. In what ways do you see logic and order? Why?

What is political about this artwork? What evidence do you see?

What do you hear when you look at this art?

What qualities do you see that reflect on an inner or outer sense of being?

How does facial expression and body language reveal states of being?

How does color imply contextual meaning?

 

Activity 1

Explore choices that affect the relationship of Aesthetics, Skills and Context. Or the ASK(C) Lens

 

Amplify CONTEXT

 

 

July 8

9:30 –10:15

 

Attendance, Initial Interview, introductions, warm-up

 

 

10:30 –12:30

Emmanuelle Leutz, “George Washington Crossing the Delaware”

 

Describe, analyze, and interpret.

Ask questions and make lists

Explore choices that affect the relationship of Aesthetics, Skills and Context. (ASC Lens)

Amplify CONTEXT

What happens when you remove context?

 

Sign your name 10 different ways.

( child, caligraphy, IRS check, Doctor, form, declaration of Independence,

 

Present a portrait of yourself.

What aspect of thre ASC lens do you favor?

 

Make a second portrait of your self using one of the aspects of ASC that was less obious in your first portrait.

 

What is your inclination to the ASC relationship?

 

Supplies

TV monitor, drawing pencils, 18"x24" white drawing paper, craypas,

Reflection

How would you describe the line quality that you use in your signatures? What does this reveal?

What do you learn about yourself through the artwork you have made?

 

What connections do you see between Aesthetics, Skills and Context?

Activity 2

Aesthetics, Skills and Context and performance

 

July 8

2:45 –4:30

How did the ASC lens apply to the performance of “ as if the Past Were Listening”

 

Graphically represent the performance you just saw using the ASC lens.

Supplies

TV monitor, Construction paper, cardboard, Elmer’s glue, scissors, drawing pencils, 18"x24" white drawing paper and craypas.

Reflection

 

What do you learn about yourself through the artwork you have made?

In groups of 3-4 discuss:

How did the ASC lens affect the work you made as, Artist, Art Specialist, and Enthusiast?

Ask one person in each group to report back on the dynamics of the group discussion.

Make a list of partnering qualities.

What can be said about these partnering qualities?

What is relationship to your ASC lens when viewing performances?

 

Museum 1

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

July 9

9:30 –12:30

 

Emmanuelle Leutz, “George Washington Crossing the Delaware”

Grant Wood, “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere”

Bill Violla, Video Installtion

Chinese Rock Garden

Chuck Close, “Portrait”

In groups of 3-4 find artworks that seem to amplify Aesthetics, Skills or Context.

 

Activity 3

Reflection of the museum visit

 

July 9

3:30 –4:30

Create a memory/ souvenir or mementos of the museum visit.

Supplies

TV monitor, Construction paper, cardboard, Elmer’s glue, scissors, craypas, drawing pencils, 18"x24" white drawing paper.

Reflection

What connections do you see between Aesthetics, Skills and Context?

Activity 4

Cultural context on Aesthetics, Skills and Context

 

July 10

9:30 –12:30

Chinese Rock Garden

African: Dogon, Ancestral Figures”

Clifford Still, “Untitled”

 

How do cultural differences change the way we read art?

What do different cultures / nationalities do to FASCINATE viewers?

 

Build an activity around an artwork in groups of 3-4.

Ask volunteers to test run one their activities.

Form a question to investigate about the art.

Create an overriding question.

 

Supplies

TV monitor, Construction paper, cardboard, Elmer’s glue, scissors, drawing pencils, 18"x24" white drawing paper.

Reflection

How does viewing art change the way we think of Aesthetics, Skills and Context?

What do you learn about yourself through the artwork you have made?

How do cultural differences change the way we read art?

How would you describe the partnering you see within the group activity of viewing and talking=g about art?

How does group discussion become an activity?

Activity 5

Symbolic Relationships as Art

 

July 10

1:30 –4:30

Florine Stettheimer, “The Cathedrals of Art”

Salvador Dali, “Madonna”

Marcel Duchamp, ”Bottle rack”

What happens when you strip away the idea that art is made with skills?

 

What is the balance between Aesthetics, Skills and Context?

 

Use objects that you find in NYC / LCI that say something.

How can you arrange the objects to say something through the symbolic relationship to each other as opposed to making a scrapbook of objects?

Set up a gallery of class artwork. Create titles.

Supplies

TV monitor, Elmer’s glue, tape, hot glue, scissors, drawing pencils, 18"x24" white drawing paper, wire, audio tapes and audio recorder.

Reflection

What do you learn about your partners through the artwork you have made?

What were your criteria’s for selecting the objects in your artwork?

What connections can you find between this activity and the work you did with other teaching artists.

What connections do you see between the visual arts teaching method and methods you could use in your own classroom teaching?

How do ideas become partners?

 

Museum 2

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

 

July 11

9:30 –12:30

Grant Wood, “The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere”

Florine Stettheimer, “The Cathedrals of Art”

Chinese Rock Garden

Chuck Close, “Portrait”

African: Dogon, Ancestral Figures”

Bill Viola, Video Installation

Barnett Neuman, “Composition”

Clifford Still, “Untitled”

Salvador Dali, “Madonna”

Emmanuelle Leutz, “George Washington Crossing the Delaware”

 

Find relationship within the room of art that we studied that creates a lens of comparison that connects to something you are interested.

In groups of three discuss ways in which your ideas can combine to form a unit of study.

Discuss what was shared and what was let go.

Have a fourth person document the dynamics of the relationships that were observed during the discussion.

 

Activity 6

Reflection on Museum Visit

 

July 11

1:30 –2:15

Make a self-portrait through the lens of a culture you saw at the museum?

 

Consider how your use of Aesthetics, Skills and Context change to embrace the Aesthetics, Skills and Context of the new culture.

Supplies

TV Monitor, cardboard, Elmer’s glue, scissors, drawing pencils, 18"x24" white drawing paper. Paint, brushes, cups, buckets, water,

Reflection

How did your use of Aesthetics, Skills and Context change to embrace the Aesthetics, Skills and Context of the new culture?

Activity 7

Reflecting on Aesthetics, Skills and Context

 

July 12

9:30 –12:30

View artworks created during the workshop.

In groups of three-4 discuss what you learn about each other’s fascination.

What kind of balance do you see between Aesthetics, Skills and Context?

What do you need to know do understand these art works?

How do skills affect the way your group relates to some art works as opposed to others?

What choices seem to have aesthetic significance?

Revisit activity: Create a self-portrait. (Consider ASC lens)

Create a follow-up activity.

How is the partnering of Teaching Artist (aesthetics) with Art Specialists (curriculum) affected by the relationship of skills, context and aesthetics?

Supplies

TV Monitor, cardboard, Elmer’s glue, scissors, drawing pencils, 18"x24" white drawing paper. Paint, brushes, cups, buckets, water,

Activity 8

Contemplation on Reflection

 

July 12

1:30 –4:30

Make something that reveals contemplation on your reflection.

Bring in something of your own artwork, expression, and creation.

Compare recent portrait to your pre-workshop art. What has changed and remained the same?

What do you wish to take from the Teaching Artist / Art Specialist?

Supplies

Post it tags, blue tape, TV Monitor, cardboard, Elmer’s glue, scissors, drawing pencils, 18"x24" white drawing paper. Paint, brushes, cups, buckets, water,

Touchstones

Connections

Shadows Child, Urban Bushwomen

Folk Tales, David Gonzales

Contextual Information

Maxine Greene, “ The Blue Guitar”

Howard Gardner, “Multiple Intelligences: the Theory in Practice”

 

John Toth; toth@pipeline.com