Aesthetic Education/ArtEducation

SUNY, New Paltz, ArtEducation Dept. & Lincoln Center Institute

Spring 2006

 

 

SUNY: Prof. Ann Teed

LCI AE Consultant; Holly Fairbank
LCI Teaching Artist: John Toth

 

ART WORK:
American Scenery

Museum: DorskyMuseum of Art / SUNY, New Paltz

Curator:Neil C. Trager

 

Mathew Pokoik: New York City
 

Course Syllabus

 

THE ARTWORKS UNDER STUDY:

American Scenery

Asher Durand, Woodland Interior, 1855 (texture, mood, no horizon line)

John Herman Carmiencke, Catskill Cove, 1863

Thomas Prichard Rossiter, Niagara Falls, 1858  (multiple points of view)

DeWitt Clinton Boutelle, Sunset, n.d. (mood - exaggerated color)

Second Nature

Amy Cheng, Time Travel, 2005

Pamela Wallace, Salvaged Bundle, 2005-06

Anat Shiftan, Red, 2005

 

 

 

AESTHETIC  LINE OF INQUIRY

 

 

How do the artists of American Scenery and Second Nature present boundaries between personal and cultural points of view using visual elements of horizon line, (birds eye, worms eye, eye level), color & texture as a transformation of mood, symbolism, scale/(close-up, far-away), choice of materials and the portrayal of time?

PEDAGOGICAL INQUIRY:

Š         How does Aesthetic inquiry become a method to engage viewers in an ongoing dialogue of action and reflection?

Š         How does Literacy connect to Art?

Š        What kind of questions does the artwork evoke?

Š        Can you create questions that address different learning modalities? (Gardner)

  • Can you create a line-of-inquiry that connects a group of artworks together?
  •  

 

 

March 3, 10:00 – 11:30  (Toth)

Theme: Horizon Line

Inquiry: How does a horizon line communicate a point of view?

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Objective:

  • Explore the use of horizon line as a boundary between sky and land.

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Activites;

q       Design a landscape composition.

  • Explore different placements of a horizon line in each quadrant.
  • Explore different qualities of line while making a horizon line in each quadrant.
  • Use two different qualities of shading to communicate 4 different emotional points of view in each of the four quadrants.
  • Present drawings in groups of two.
  • Translate your 4 sketches into a collage using only two pieces of different color construction paper. Tear or cut the pieces to reflect the qualities in the original sketch.
  • Use Elmer’s glue to assemble the collage a new piece of paper.
  • Create a simple four-sentence poem that uses the 4 different sketches to tell a story.

q       REFLECTION ON ACTIVITY.

  • Present poems with the sketches.
  • Reflect, compare, analyze, synthesize, and discuss the differences.

 

 

March 3, 11:30-12:00 (Fairbank)

               Reflectionconversation on Toth’s pedagogy, methods, and strategies noticed

 

March 3, 1:00 – 3:00 (TOTH)

1st Museum Visit

American Scenery

Asher Durand, Woodland Interior, 1855 (texture, mood, no horizon line)

Second Nature

Amy Cheng, Time Travel, 2005

 

Objective:

Introduce the process of noticing: describe, analyze, interpret, and reflect description, comparison, and synthesis, constructing new meaning, consider the opinions of others.

 

ACTIVITY:

Find a painting in the collection that speaks to your own sketches and poem. Make additional sketches with pencils that add details to your own point of view.

 

Write a concrete poem that synthesizes your experience on the day’s activity.

Go back to the classroom and make a new artwork using craypas, color markers or color pencils that considers the subject matter of the concrete poem that you created.

 

REFLECTION:

  • What kind of questions or activities did your museum experience induce?
  • How do we compare and contrast our own experiences of creative space with the kind of creative space that we create in the classroom?
  • What kind of choices do we give our students to define their own creative space?

 

 

Between March 3 & 17

Readings for Homework (TEED)

q      Maxine Greene article -2 page description ofaesthetic education from “Variations on A Blue Guitar”

q      “A Unique Approach to Education”-2 page document from LCI on Aesthetic Inquiry

q      Gallery Guide-American Scenery: Different Viewsin Hudson River school painting

 

March 17, 10:00 – 12:00 (TOTH)


Focus: 
Point of view: birds-eye, worms-eye and eye-level

Inquiry: How does point of view / birds-eye, worms-eye and eye-level orientations influence communication?

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Objective:

Explore birds-eye, worms-eye and eye-level points of view as a means of influencing multiple outcomes.

 

ACTIVITY:

  • As a skill activity take a digital photo of a simple object. View this object on a TV monitor or vide projector.  Draw three different points of view (birds-eye, worms-eye and eye-level).
  • Construct a simple natural still life (rocks, twigs, leaves, etc.)
  • Choose birds-eye, worms-eye and eye-level points of view as a means of creating a point of view about nature. (Personal, impersonal, majestic, act.)
  • Consider close-up and far-away views.
  • Inquiry: What kind of point-of-view does your artwork convey? What kind of point of view did the Hudson River School paintings convey? How is Romanticism evident in these paintings?
  • Use elements of nature to define a contemporary point of view that considers the myths and beliefs throughout the history of the Hudson valley? (Consider birds-eye, worms-eye and eye-level, close-up and far-away)
  • Use craypa’s, tempera paint, brushes, buckets, water, drop cloth, color pencils, color construction paper, scissors, glue, rulers, post-its, tape, pencils, large role paper,

 

REFLECTION ON ACTIVITY.

  • How do the finished artworks change the way we think or feel about the object through the choice of point of view?

 

 

 

March 17, 1:00 – 3:00 (TOTH)

Focus:  Color and texture as a transformation of mood and concept.

Inquiry: How can color and texture transform our point of view and the way we view nature?

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Objective:

Explore: Consider reason and imagination as a means of transforming the way we interpret our world through the use of color. (seeing the world through rose colored glasses)

 

ACTIVITY:

Š        Divide 11x14” paper into four quadrant.

Š        Create 4 simple landscape compositions, as in activity 1.

  • Make a list of different moods (go beyond the obvious categories)
  • Use this list of moods to create color backgrounds for each landscape that express a variety of moods or concepts.
  • Choose one of the images from your landscape studies. Use tempera paints to elaborate details in nature that amplify the mood or concept of your point of view.
  • Use craypas, tempera paint, brushes, buckets, water, drop cloth, color pencils, craypas, pencils, 11x14” paper paper,

 

REFLECTION:

  • How does the transformed color affect our experience of the landscape?
  • What did you discover about the process of inquiry in this guided looking experience?
 

Homework (TEED)

 

April 7, 10:00 – 12:00 (TOTH)
Focus:
Symbolism in nature

 

Inquiry: How can landscape painting and the presentation of nature use symbolism to communicate a point of view that is personal or communal?

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Objective:

Explore symbols as a means of communicating a point of view about nature.

 

ACTIVITY:

Š        Write a short poem about your point of view on the current state of nature.

  • Draw simple symbols using basic shapes like circle, square, triangle and rectangle.  
  •  
  • Use craypas, tempera paint, brushes, buckets, water, drop cloth, color pencils, color construction paper, scissors, glue, rulers, post-its, tape, pencils, large role paper.
  •  

REFLECTION ON ACTIVITY.

  • What do the finished artworks reveal that goes beyond product?

How can we create a creative space for learning, discovery, and experimentation?

  • ?

 

April 7, 1:00 – 3:00 (TOTH)

2nd Museum Visit

 

Inquiry: How does a second viewing of the work of art affect your original point of view on nature?

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Objective:

Explore & Coach Guided Looking

 

American Scenery

Asher Durand, Woodland Interior, 1855 (texture, mood, no horizon line)

John Herman Carmiencke, Catskill Cove, 1863

Thomas Prichard Rossitier, Niagara Falls, 1858  (multiple points of view)

DeWitt Clinton Boutelle, Sunset, n.d. (mood - exaggerated color)

 

Second Nature

Amy Cheng, Time Travel, 2005

Pamela Wallace, Salvaged Bundle, 2005-06

Anat Shiftan, Red, 2005

 

 

Activity; Ask students to take turns leading the process of noticing: describe, analyze, interpret, and reflect description, comparison, and synthesis, constructing new meaning, consider the opinions of others.

 

ACTIVITY:

  • Why does the contemporary show look so different than the art from the turn of the century?
  • Write a concrete poem that synthesizes your experience of both shows through a timeline that shows the process of change.
  • Go back to the classroom and make a new artwork using craypas, color markers or color pencils that considers the subject matter of the concrete poem that you created.

 

REFLECTION:

  • What kind of questions or activities did your museum experience induce?
  • How do the two shows on nature differ?
  • How does the philosophy and politics of the day affect the way we ‘read’ or interpret the work of art?

 

 

CONTECTUAL INFORMATION:

Inquiry:

  • What kind of information, reading, research or demonstration can you use after or before a visual arts unit of study?
  • What kind of connections can you make to link the visual arts to curriculum?
    • Birdcliff 1902
  • Ralph Whitehead, John Dewey, Bolton Brown and Ruskin
  • Maxine Greene, Variations on a Blue Guita
  • John Dewey, Art As Experience”, Chapter 9

 

Homework (TEED) (select from readings above?)

 

 

 

April 21 , 10:00 – 12:00 (FAIRBANK & TOTH)

Introduction to Pokoik Photos, Modeling The Planning Session, & developing lines of inquiry

Inquiry: How does the project you just completed help prepare you to lead a group through this aesthetic process?

Warm-Up/Activity:

  • Physical warm-up led by Holly based on line of inquiry for Pokoik photos (to be discussed ahead of time with John and TBD)
  • Possible framing activity with paper frames to experience choice making

 

Activity:

    • Looking at Pokoik Photos with John modeling (or done by a volunteer with John’s support)
    • Reveal the Planning Process around photos (7 boxes)
    • Break into groups according to expertise (dancers, etc) and begin to brainstorm lines of inquiry for photos using brainstorming guide

 

 

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Objective:

Introduce the art of Mathew Pokoik and model the planning session and development of a line of inquiry and appropriate activities

April 21, 1:00 – 3:00 (FAIRBANK, TOTH & TEED)

Activity Design Around Pokoik Photos

 

Activity;

Workshop in designing activities that scaffold activities that directly build upon the line of inquiry developed earlier in the day.

 

Reflection:

  • What do you need to know about Pokoik and these photographs to design your activity?
  • What materials will you need for your activities?
  • How will your activities relate to others in the camp experience?
  • What strategies will best suit your activity and why?

 

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HOMEWORK (TEED)

  • Individually or in pairs develop three related activities for studying Pokoik photos for use in camp setting this summer.
  • Use brainstorming and activity guide supplied as much as possible
  • Integrate contextual resources supplied when feasible

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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May 12, 10:00 – 12:00 (TOTH & TEED)

Sharing Activities & Reflecting on the Practice

Focus; Students Share Activity Ideas for Dutchess Art Camp.

Inquiry: What do I know and what do Ai need to know about designing an aesthetic education activity around the Pokoik photos?-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Objective:

To give students a chance to share their activity designs around Pokoik photos to their peers, supervising teachers and professors (Toth & Teed) for constructive feedback before use in summer

 

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Objective:

Reflect on AE experience and make concrete connection to own practice as a facilitator/educator.

 

ACTIVITY:

  • Share out and demonstrate with group activities developed

Reflection:

Š        

 

May 12, 1:00 – 3:00  (TOTH & TEED)

Inquiry;

What have I learned and how do I apply it?

 

ACTIVITY:

PROCESS NOT THE PRODUCT:

Š       Make a visual network/ map/ drawing using symbols or icons that show the hyperlinks to our process.

Š       Consider the elements of a Integrated Thinking Model that considers connections across learning modalities

 

Homework:

  • Create a simple portfolio of your art work adding contextual information and photographs, newspaper clippings, found objects ect.